Show Your Tires You Love Them for Valentine’s Day

You Auto CareDon’t forget to show your tires some love this Valentine’s Day by making sure their pressure is right. Not only will your tires love you for extending their service life, you will be happier because properly inflated tires mean safer driving and better gas mileage.

Unscrew the valve cap and press the tire gauge on the valve stem. You will hear a hissing sound when you first press down, but it stops once you press all the way down. You only need a few seconds to get an accurate reading. Be sure to check your owner’s manual to find out the manufacturer’s recommendation for proper tire pressure. Although you will see a tire pressure number on the tire, that number is the maximum pressure, so you’ll want to inflate to the pressure recommended in the manual instead. Once you’ve reached the right pressure, replace the valve cap. Do the same for all four tires.

If your tires need air, you can fill them with a portable compressor, or use the air pump at your gas station. Filling the tires is a lot like checking the pressure except that instead of pressing the gauge to the valve stem, you’ll be pressing the fitting on the air hose to the stem.  Watch  the pressure as you inflate until you reach the right pressure number. If your tires are over inflated, remove the excess air from the tires with your gauge. Remember that hissing sound? When you hear it, let it go for a moment, then recheck the pressure. The more experienced you become with checking your tires, the better you will be able to tell how long you need to inflate or deflate to get the right pressure.

Remember, even if your tires look okay, that does not mean the pressure is correct. By the time a tire looks underinflated, tire pressure is extremely low. Make sure you catch it before it gets to that point.

 

Teaching Younger Drivers Vehicle and Tire Maintenance

teensEach year a new batch of younger drivers pulls onto America’s roadways. During their intensive training, they learn the rules of the road, how to maneuver a vehicle, and the importance of safe driving. Especially poignant for this new tech-savvy generation, they are warned about the dangers of distracted driving. With all of this preparation, there is one important area that seems to have been overlooked with younger drivers. That area is the importance of vehicle and tire maintenance.

A recent Tire Review article illustrates this problem by highlighting a recent study commissioned by Goodyear Auto Service and Just Tires. According to the study, “Younger drivers (millennial/Gen Z) are more than 1.5 times more likely to identify popular emojis correctly than the tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) warning symbol.”

As the article points out, failure to identify the TPMS light likely means that the necessary services indicated by vehicle warning lights are being ignored. The study also found that most of the surveyed younger drivers were not taking adequate measures to prepare their vehicles for winter:

“Among drivers who live in areas with usually cold winters, less than half (42%) get their tires checked in advance of the winter season. And almost two in five winter drivers (37%) do not take any action at all to prepare their cars for winter unless they have an issue. As a general rule of thumb, drivers should check their tires monthly, especially during temperature shifts of 10 degrees or more.”

One of the best ways to combat the problem of poorly prepared younger drivers is for seasoned drivers to seek out the young people in their lives and offer them guidance. Educate new drivers on the importance of preventative car care and how proper maintenance directly effects driver safety.

CarCare.org offers free online resources for new drivers. Among the available resources are:

Take time to prepare the younger drivers in your life. They will benefit from increased confidence and you will enjoy the peace of mind in knowing they are fully ready for the road!

Make Regular Auto and Tire Care Your 2019 Resolution

happy-year-2019How much thought do you give to your vehicle and how it is running? Do you only notice your tires if they are flat? Perhaps your resolution for 2019 should be making a commitment to preventative auto and tire care. Consistent auto and tire care not only make sense for protecting and prolonging the life of your vehicle and tires, it also means you will be safer on the road.

When it comes to taking care of your tires, the most important things to check regularly are tire pressure and tread depth. Set a reminder on your calendar to check your tire pressure at least once a month. Check your owner’s manual to find the recommended tire pressure for your vehicle. The pressure of your spare tire should also be checked to assure it is ready when you need it.

Make sure the tread depth of your tires is sufficient by using the penny test. Hold a penny so you can read “In God We Trust” across the top. Insert it into several different sections of the tire and look at Lincoln’s head.  If you can see the top of Lincoln’s head, it is time for a new set of tires. If the tread is in good shape, Abe’s head will be covered to about the forehead hairline.

In order to be sure your vehicle is running properly and performing at its best, you must stay on schedule with recommended regular maintenance services. While it is easy to put these services off, it is always far less costly in terms of time and money to catch problems before they become serious and expensive. The services listed below are commonly recommended, but you should consult your owner’s manual for your vehicle’s suggested services and frequency.

  • Coolant Flush and Replacement
  • Oil Change
  • Fluid Checks – Power Steering and Brake
  • Brake Inspection
  • Check Belts & Hoses
  • Filters – Air and Fuel
  • Battery & Cables
  • Lights
  • Exhaust System
  • Windshield Washer Fluid & Wiper Blades

Both your vehicle and tires will also benefit from consistent tire balancing and rotation service. These services should be performed in accordance with your owner’s manual recommended schedule. Tire balancing assures even tire wear and provides a smooth ride by properly adjusting the wheel weight distribution around the vehicle. Tire rotation will greatly extend the life of your tires. Manufacturers have specific recommendations, so be sure to refer to your owner’s manual tire rotation guidelines.

Establishing a regular care routine allows you to drive with confidence knowing that you are traveling safely. You will also get to enjoy your vehicle and tire investment much longer.

Holiday Travel Season is Here!

christmas carThe American Automobile Association Year-End Holiday Travel Forecast reports that more than a third of Americans will travel over the holidays. This is the highest number since AAA has been tracking holiday travel in 2001.

According to the AAA forecast, a recent drop to the cheapest national gas price averages of the year and an increase in disposable income are motivating more Americans to roadtrip this holiday season. Gas prices averaged $2.46 for the first week of December, which is two cents per gallon less than one year ago.

If a road trip is part of your holiday plans, make sure you are safe and prepared. Here are a few preparation tips to keep in mind:

  • Be sure your vehicle is ready! Have a service check including: battery, brakes, wipers, lights, oil, coolant, fluids, and tire pressure.
  • Get an app like GasBuddy to help you find the best gas prices on your route.
  • Update your GPS or print a fresh set of directions for your trip. If you are the old school type, visit a gas station or AAA for a new set of paper maps.
  • As you pack the car, do not remove roadside necessities to make room for packages and luggage. (No matter how tempting it may be to do so) You may need emergency items such as jumper cables or a folding shovel.

Wishing everyone happy holiday travels!

Is Warming Up the Car in Winter Necessary?

car-791089_1920In the winter time, getting out of bed and facing the day is just a little bit harder. I, personally, need to take a moment to prepare with a cup of coffee to warm me up. But what about the cold vehicles we are about to climb into to take us where we need to go – don’t they need some warm up time, too? Despite a common misconception, the answer is actually no.

While cars used to require warming up in the days of carburetor fuel systems, today’s cars are equipped with fuel-injection technology, computer systems, and thinner synthetic oils. These new developments make warm ups unnecessary in newer cars.

Instead of warming up your vehicle by letting it idle, try taking it easy as you hit the road.

According to the Car Care Council, warming up, or idling longer that 30 seconds is unnecessary. A better way to warm up an engine is to drive slowly as you begin your trip. As you pull out of your driveway or parking lot, do not gun the engine, instead just take it slow for the first few minutes as you head down the road.

While warming up the car may not do anything for the car mechanically, starting your car before you are ready to go can get the car warmed up for your comfort. Keep in mind, though, warming your car does have some drawbacks. Idling reduces fuel economy and causes excessive wear or stress on engine components, such as cylinders, spark plugs, and the exhaust system. Another reason why warming up is not such a great idea is pollution.  A vehicle that idles for more than 30 seconds increases air pollution.

It is easy to underestimate the impact of one car, but together, we can make a significant reduction in air pollution.

Five Important Cold Weather Car Care Items to Do Now

Cold weather car careAre you ready for the cold? How about your car? Believe it or not, cold weather can have serious effects on your vehicle. Cold weather maintenance involves preventative measures of all sorts.

Here are five important items you should add to your to-do list, to make sure that your car is ready for the cold weather:

  1. Fill your antifreeze: When was the last time you checked or refilled your antifreeze? If it’s been a awhile, then your car could definitely use it.
  2. Check your oil: If your car is due for an oil change, consider refilling it with a lower viscosity oil, which does a better job of handling extreme temperatures. The lower the viscosity, the thinner it is, and the more it will retain its fluidity in cold temperatures.
  3. Stock up on emergency items: Preparing your car for a winter season includes packing some emergency items in your trunk/back seat. Items include: an ice scraper, blanket, first-aid kit, extra clothes, flashlight, jumper cables, and anything else you think you might need in case of emergency. Of course, this is completely out of precaution, but it always helps to be prepared.
  4. Monitor tire pressure: Even the slightest temperature changes can impact tire pressure. Make sure to check the optimal tire pressure on the label of the driver’s side door frame or in your owner’s manual.
  5. Think about new tires: Especially in adverse conditions, car tires are one of the only things keeping you from a major spin out, collision, and other roadside disasters. Chances are if you’ve been thinking about getting new ones, you probably need them.

Before holiday season festivities fill up your schedule, take care of these winter car care items. You will be prepared when the winter weather arrives in full force.

Be Afraid of Driving on Old Tires!

Be Afraid of Driving on Old TiresNever mind ghosts, witches and zombies, do you know what is really frightening? Driving on old tires!

It is critical to your safety on the road that you are able to recognize the signs of worn out, dangerous tread. Even if old tires look okay, they could be seriously compromised and pose a serious a safe driving hazard.

Old tires may not show any obvious signs of deterioration. While they may appear to be safe, usable tires, cracks can develop both on the inside and the outside of the tire. Since the rubber compounds used in tires degrade over time, cracks will develop in the rubber, regardless of mileage and wear. Ultimately, this cracking leads to the steel belts in the tread separating from the rest of the tire.

The Rubber Manufacturers Association reports that putting an expiration date on a tire can be difficult since factors such as heat, driving, and storage conditions can greatly impact the usable life of a tire. The recommendation of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is to refer to the guidelines set by the specific tire manufacturer when it comes to tire aging and usable life.

Not unsure how old your tires are? In 2000 the U.S. Department of Transportation began requiring tires to have a DOT code. With this code, you can learn details about the tire, including its age. Decipher the code by downloading a free app offered by the Tire Safety Group. Available for Android and iPhone, the app enables you to get to get a free Tire Facts Report by simply entering the DOT code from your tire.  The report lets you know if a tire is old, defective, or has been the subject of a recall. The app shows you where to find the code on the tire and even includes a flashlight function to help you see the code clearly!

If your tires are damaged, old, worn or otherwise compromised, don’t risk the scare of a blowout or a wreck! Buy some new tires as soon as possible!

October is Fall Car Care Month

October is Car Care MonthBasic auto service and repairs can go a long way in improving the safety and dependability of a vehicle. The non-profit Car Care Council recommends 10 Fall Car Care maintenance procedures that will help your vehicle operate at its best before the winter season arrives.

Fall Car Care Month is the perfect time to give your car the much needed attention before cooler and harsher weather sets in. Just like the Car Care Council, we suggest that now is the time to take care of your vehicle to avoid potential headaches in the future.

Check all fluids – Window washer solvent, anti-freeze/coolant as well as engine oil, power steering, brake & transmission.

Check the battery – Replace if necessary. Ensure the connection is tight, clean, and free of corrosion.

Check hoses & belts – Make sure they are not loose, cracked, brittle, or even showing signs of excessive wear.

Check your brakes – Annual brake checks are suggested. As well as taking a look at the rotors, drums & brake linings.

Inspect the exhaust system – Leaks, damage & broken elements can occur. Inspect for unusual behaviors or loud noises.

Check your engine – Your vehicle craves the best balance of power & fuel economy while producing the lowest level of emissions.

Check your wipers – It’s important to see and be seen during winter driving. Check all the interior and exterior lighting.

Check heating/HVAC system – Proper heating & cooling performance is crucial for your safety.

Inspect steering & suspension – Annual checking is recommended. We would also encourage a review of other components like shock absorbers, struts, ball joints & tie rod ends.

Check your tires – Uneven wear and tears can greatly affect your safety. As can poorly inflated tires.

Vehicle manufacturers have specific recommendations, so be sure to refer to your owner’s manual tire rotation guidelines if you have specific questions.

Be Prepared for Dead Car Battery

dead car batteryFall is here and soon the temperatures will be getting colder. Since low temperatures lead to sluggish batteries, your chances of experiencing a dead car battery will be increased. As the colder months approach, you will not only want to be equipped with a quality set of jumper cables in your car, you will also need to know how to use them safely.

Jump starting a vehicle isn’t difficult, but because jumper cables transmit electrical current from one car to another, it can be dangerous if not done correctly. It is necessary to take precautions to prevent dangerous electric shocks.

Once you have purchased your jumper cables and have them stowed in your vehicle, take some time to review these steps so you will be prepared to use them!

Getting Ready to Jump Starting the Car:

  1. Park the running car so the cars face each other, about one to two feet apart. Make sure that the cars are not in contact with each other.
  2. Set the parking brakes on both cars. Turn off both cars and take out the keys.
  3. Lay out the jumper cables on the ground, making sure the clamps do not touch each other.
  4. Open the hood to both cars. Locate the batteries and battery terminals. (See your owner’s manual for details). The two terminals on each battery are usually covered in red or black, with a + or – sign on top. Confirm you are able to identify which is positive, and which is negative, as this will be crucial to the success of your jump. Dirty or corroded battery terminals should be cleaned off with a rag or wire brush.

Attaching the Jumper Cables to the Car:

  1. Attach the red, positive cable clamp to the positive (+) battery terminal of the dead battery. Make sure you have a solid connection to the battery terminal.
  2. Attach the red, positive cable clamp on the other side of the jumper cables to the working battery’s positive (+) battery terminal
  3. Connect the black, negative cable clamp to the working battery’s negative (-) battery terminal. In the vehicle with the dead battery, attach that clamp to a metal part of the car that is unpainted, as far from the battery as the cable will reach. This will ground the circuit and help prevent sparking.
  4. Once you have one end of the jumper cables connected to a car, it is critical that the other end of the cables do not touch the metal clamps to anything other than the specified components on the other car. Make sure that none of the cables are in contact with moving engine parts before starting the engine.

Performing the Jump Start:

  1. Start the engine of the car with the working battery.
  2. Let the car to run for several minutes. The time required to get the jump to work may vary depending on the age and condition of the battery.
  3. Attempt to start the car with the dead battery. If unsuccessful, allow the working car to charge the battery for a several minutes longer and try again.
  4. As soon as the disabled car is running again, you can disconnect the jumper cables, starting with the black, negative cable clamps. Never allow the clamps to come in contact with each other while any part of the cables is still attached to a vehicle.
  5. Taking the charged car for a short drive lets the battery to build up a charge to ensure the battery doesn’t die again once you turn off the car.

How to Extend Tire Life

extend tire lifeTires are a significant investment. Not just because of the high price, but because of how crucial they are to your safety as well as the safety of your passengers. When buying new tires, it is important to get the right tires for your particular vehicle, make sure they are quality tires, and to have them installed by an experienced and reputable tire dealer.

Proper tire care is will go a long way toward making sure your tires stay safe and keep them performing at their best.  Keeping your tires well maintained is also the best way to extend tire life and optimize the value you get from your tire investment.

What You Can Do to Extend Tire Life

Make sure that your tires are properly inflated. When tires are allowed to drop to an inflation level that is below the recommended pressure, an additional load is placed on the shoulder of the tire, causing that area to wear prematurely. Underinflated tires also build up internal heat, increasing rolling resistance and reducing fuel  economy. It is not always easy to determine if tires are properly inflated just by looking at them. It is important to use a tire gauge to check tire pressure regularly. Keep tires inflated to the level  recommended in your owner’s manual.

Keep an eye on your tread. This is something drivers don’t often think to do unless they have a noticeable leak or have been driving on unavoidable debris. Checking your tire tread regularly provides you with the opportunity catch wear trends before they have done too much damage. Problems can be spotted by visual inspection or by running your hand over the tread and feeling for problems. Potential issues include distortion in the tread, feathering or cupping. If caught early enough, bad wear patterns can be countered to extend the tire service life.

What to Have Your Mechanic Do to Extend Tire Life

Have your wheel alignment checked regularly, according to the recommendation of your owners’ manual. A very common cause of unusual tread wear is poor vehicle alignment. When tires are unable to run straight ahead, accelerated tread wear occurs on certain parts of the tire. Regular alignment service will keep your vehicle from experiencing a variety of alignment related problems, including uneven and premature tread wear.

Along with regular alignment service, tire rotation should be performed on an ongoing basis. A consistent and documented schedule of tire rotation will promote even tread wear and extend tire service life. Wheel and suspension components can also adversely impact tire service life. A wheel bearing that has been incorrectly torqued can cause irregular tire wear. Worn shock absorbers can create depression wear on treads. Rather than waiting until trouble strikes, replace shock absorbers and other suspension components on a set schedule.